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[2019/10/22] Associate Professor Hsu has been awarded the MOST ” Ta-You Wu Memorial Award”

Associate Professor Hsu of Institute of Microbiology and Immunology

 

Immunity is a complicated yet delicate system. National Yang-Ming University Institute of Microbiology and Immunology Associate professor Hsu has discovered that abnormal metabolism will cause immune cells to malfunction! This is a revolutionary discovery in the field of immune metabolism and cytology. Associate Professor Hsu has been awarded this year’s “Ta-You Wu Memorial Award” by the Ministry of Science and Technology.

 

Associate Professor Hsu and her team have focused their research on basic science and clinical medicine. Their long term research in the “mutual support between and the influence of metabolism and immune cells” was recognized by a number of international journals. The team has discovered that immune cells are able to regulate the amount of metabolic transport proteins in cells so that they obtain the necessary chemicals for cellular synthesis. When this process of regulation cannot carry out normally, this will cause immune cells to lose their original function. By observing immune reactions in patients with abnormal metabolisms, such as lysosomal storage disease, the team was able to show that a disturbance affecting metabolism will directly affect the immune system, even to the point of accelerating the development of symptoms.

 

Associate Professor Hsu remarked, these findings open up a very new area in the field of immune metabolism and cytology. In addition to getting a glimpse of the importance of metabolism to immune cell function and its regulatory mechanisms, we also have begun to gain an understanding of the importance of immune reactions during different diseases. Our team believes that, by gaining a further understanding of the interactions between metabolism and immune cells, we will be able to apply this knowledge in the future to regulating and/or stimulating specific immune reactions. We hope that such technology will result in new innovations in clinical treatment and open up new ideas and suggestions.

 

Associate Professor Hsu and her team's research report

 

 

 

 

 


 

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